Helped Over 500,000 patients with 98%+ satisfaction.

Connect & Get Personalized 1-to-1 Answers from Expert Doctors

DoctorSpring > Question Home

Extreme Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

Resolved Question:

I must preface this by stating that I suffer from extreme OCD (med-compliant). I'm looking for reassurance that my lab results (attached) do in fact report all negatives.

10 weeks after my last intimate encounter with an ex (never sex, but close enough to constitute testing), I went through a panel to test for STDs. I arranged testing at LabCorp through a confidential third party service- tSTD, and with orders from their local ob-gyn. All tests came back negative.

I requested the original lab report and find the wording and structure of the report confusing. I was not given a specific number for HSV-1 or HSV-2, only that the result was <0.91 negative, though the reference interval is 0.0-0.90. Why would it only report as it did, as opposed to a specific number, such as "0.2"? If it did, does a higher number within the reference interval (ie- 0.909) suggest a possible presence of antibodies and would re-testing be advisable? Should I be concerned about the extra 0.01 and that it was not reported as <0.9?Also, the HSV-2 does not have the wording "non-reactive" like HSV-1 does. Is the HSV-2 still a negative? I've never noticed lesions or any symptoms out of the ordinary.

The HIV 1/O/2 Abs-Index Value also reads <1.00, with a reference interval of <.1.00 and "Index Value: Specimen reactivity relative to the negative cutoff." Can I assume this is also negative? I don't understand the wording or why, again, no specific number is provided. I doubt I'm at any-risk for HIV as my ex gets tested after each relationship, and I'm a regular blood donor and have never been deferred. However, in my current line of work I'm exposed to plenty of infectious diseases, so I want to make sure.

My last question is if 10 weeks (9 weeks, 5 days to be exact) is sufficient time for these test to be conclusive, or if I should be re-tested again at the 12 or 16 week mark to be certain? I don't want to put myself through a costly cycle of testing and re-testing if it won't change the results, but also don't want the possibility of putting anyone's health at risk in the future either. I'm also concerned that if I "catch" HSV through casual contact with loved ones before I retest, and that shows up on a repeat test, then I would be in a position of uncertainty of how I got the virus and where it's located.


Category: Sexually Transmitted Diseases(STD)Specialist

Ask Your Own Question

Category: Select Speciality
 25 Doctors Online

Expert:  Dr. Deepu S Sebastian replied 4 Days ago

Hello,

Thank you for choosing DoctorSpring.

I have gone through the lab report - let me assure you all the results are negative.

Let me explain the results here ;

Let's take the example of HSV - 1. Your test result shows <0.91 (That means your test result was 0.90 or less )

Any values less than 0.91 is negative. (That is 0.0-0.90) A specific value is not give because of 2 reasons (1) It simply does not make sense to do a quantitative analysis when the test is already negative. For example 0.1 and 0.5 has no significance and it DOES NOT say 0.5 values has a higher risk or anything. (2) You levels could be undetectable beyond the threshold of the machine.

Now why less than (0.91), when the reference range is given as 0.90. This is just a technical confusion. <0.91 does not include a value of "0.91". Had 0.91 was included it should be less than or equal to 0.91. That is why equivocal result is 0.91 to 1.09 . ( Simple technicality with regard to "<" sign and
All your tests are negative. You do not need re testing. Theoretically HIV test has to be rested at 16/18 weeks but in your case it is not really necessary.

Hope this helps
Feel free to ask for clarifications.
Thank you


Patient replied :

Thank you, that helps tremendously. Can I be confident that I waited long enough for the HSV testing? I've read that the window period for antibodies to show up can be anywhere from 2-16 weeks. Is 9 weeks long enough for most people to have shown the antibodies by now?


Expert:  Dr. Deepu S Sebastian replied 3 Days ago

Yes 9 weeks is a reasonably good time period for HSV antibody detection. Moreover you did not have any outbreak or symptoms. So no reason to worry. Thank you


Dr. Deepu S Sebastian
Category: Select Speciality
Experience: 
MD, Internal Medicine - Stanley Medical School
Medical School - MBBS - Govt. Medical College, Kottyaam

Diagnostic Prediction - Stanford School of Medicine
Received Specialty training in Critical Care, Cardiology, Neurology, Gastroenterology, Nephrology from Stanley Medical College and in Endocrinology, Rheumatology.

Hematology and Geriatrics from Madras Medical College.
Dr. Deepu S Sebastian and 4 other Medical Specialists are ready to help you

Users who read this, also read:

Make informed and better medical decisions.

Join the 500,000 people who found a smarter, quicker way to get Answers, Recommendations & Expert Opinions.

Expert Doctors at fingertips

Recommendation on next step. Second-opinion.Multi-specialty.

Save Time

Average time for answers: 6 hours.

Save Money

$35 for typical specialist consult vs. $120 for a local appointment.

Free Follow-ups

Clarify, ask further questions for free in private conversation.

100% Satisfaction

Money back guarantee for the 1st reply. MEDNET Quality Board.

Start My Consultation

CHAT NOW

About DoctorSpring.com

Doctor Spring is a novel online Doctor consultation platform where you can get your medical questions answered by leading Doctors. Just Submit your question and rest assured that you will consult a Doctor easily. Once you submit the question, the Doctor from the concerned specialty will reply within hours. You can always ask more questions or add details with follow-up question options and make it an online doctor chat. You may use this service to consult a specialty or for getting medical second opinion. All paid services come with a MEDNET quality assurance and 100% money back guarantee.

DoctorSpring in news